ICYMI: People Are Talking About Participatory Grantmaking

Participatory grantmaking continues to gain traction with grantmakers and grantseekers alike, as more are looking at the value and outcomes of grantmaking that includes all stakeholders in the full process and the ways that participatory grantmaking can improve funder/grantee power dynamics, build stronger alliances, help achieve DEI-related goals, and have a deeper impact on the issues at hand. GrantCraft’s Deciding Together field guide explores this movement in great detail, complete with case studies and helpful tips, and companion templates in the Mechanics section of our website. Since the publication of this guide, we are always on the hunt for new knowledge about how participatory grantmaking is being implemented. Here are three recent compelling reads exploring the impact of participatory grantmaking.

 

Two beautiful black women stand together. Strong African American girls side by side. Sisterhood and females friendship.

Telling My Truth as a Black Woman Made Me a Better Grant Maker

(Jasmine Sudarkasa, The Chronicle of Philanthropy, February 9, 2021) This first-person account of participatory grantmaking (PGM) at work at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation demonstrates that PGM can also effectively be used within large foundations as a means to lift up under-represented voices and lived experience.

In the face of a people-led movement, philanthropic institutions were woefully ill equipped. By this point, I was, too. I sat in my apartment, looking at facilitation plans for “equitable learning,” and felt like an idiot. Enough was enough. I couldn’t separate my Blackness from my responsibilities as a grant maker. I needed to tell my truth.

And so, I started talking. I cried, too. And surprisingly, people at Hewlett started listening. Those people included Larry Kramer, our president. He heard me, as fearful and enraged as I was. Then he invited me to stand in that fear and do something about it.

Read more>>

A diverse group of unrecognizable people stand in line to vote. A woman at the end of the line holds an American flag.

To Support Democracy, Foundations Must Practice Democracy

(Josh Lerner, Nonprofit Quarterly, February 9, 2021) Democracy in America (and around the world) depends largely on where the funding goes. Josh Lerner asserts that, “It’s an inconvenient truth, but foundations are one of the most durable bastions of oligarchy. They are generally governed by a small group of benefactors and professionals, who are disproportionately white, wealthy, and male.” Want more democracy? We need more democratic distribution of philanthropic dollars.

Democracy is under attack around the world, and many foundations are rallying to its defense. Yet at the same time, many foundations in their mode of operations are practicing and reinforcing the anti-democratic ideology of the attackers. By preaching democracy externally but practicing oligarchy internally, funders undermine their investments and our democracy.

To confront the crisis of democracy, directing external funding to pro-democracy groups and causes is not enough. Funders must also undo their internal anti-democratic practices. This means ending top-down decision-making by a small ruling elite. It also requires shifting power to communities. Fortunately, we already have models for how to do this.

Read more>>

Teamwork concept with building puzzle. People working together with giant puzzle elements. Symbol of partnership and collaboration. Flat vector illustration isolated on white background.

Shifting Power to Communities in Grant Funding

(Rodney Foxworth and Marcus Haymon, Stanford Social Innovation Review, January 20, 2021) Foundations are being called to examine how institutional practices deepen inequality instead of dismantling it: from arduous application processes to repetitive reporting requirements, business as usual in the funding world feels more about maintaining control than sharing it. “To address this painful history, and implement policies based on trust and equity, philanthropists must give up power in decisions around funding deployment. Inclusive decision making can have more inclusive and powerful results.”

So, funders must ask themselves: Where in our processes might we share decision making? How might we create space for grantees to tell us about their impact, in their own words, to shape our thinking? How might we be equitable in all aspects of our work, including our investment? The urgency of this moment is calling on us to look across our systems and center those who are building the world we so desperately need.

Read more>>

 

Read a recent article about participatory grantmaking that you’d like to share? Email us at [email protected].

 

About the author(s)

Content Development Associate
Candid

Building Resilience through Participation with a New Global Fund

Girls, young womxn*, trans and gender non-conforming youth  are living on the front lines of the COVID-19 crisis in many ways, both direct and indirect, including increased caregiving burdens, horrific and ever rising rates of domestic violence, soaring unemployment and disrupted food supply chains, all under the auspices of what many see as an acceleration of state sponsored human rights violations under the cover of lock-down.

Yet we can also understand the pandemic as just one moment in a continuum of crises that form the backdrop and foreground of girls and young womxns’ lives across time and place. In this context, young feminist activists are showing up in this moment with the strategies, the creativity, the courage, and the resilience they bring to all their organizing. The Global Resilience Fund, a pop-up partnership between 22 funder organizations housed at and facilitated by Purposeful, exists to resource their resistance at speed and scale.

The fund is supporting groups, collectives, and organizations that are led by girls, young womxn, and trans and non-binary young people under the age of 30. From late May to early August this year, there were over 1000 applications submitted. By the end of the Round 2 disbursement period (there will be three rounds in total) the fund will have distributed grants to 129 groups from 67 counties. Twenty of these groups are led by 19-25 year-olds and 29 led by those under 19 years-old.

Contemporary art motif

Despite being directly impacted by and responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, these groups are historically and continually underfunded, they are often unregistered organizations and experience a range of barriers in accessing funding. There are a number of reasons why they cannot be officially registered including the age of the activists (“too young”) or the work that they are carrying out, for example, crackdowns on organizing of a certain type or closing space for civil society.

But their work is cutting edge and pushes against systemic and normalized discrimination; their tactics are political and grounded in their lived realities and the injustices they directly face. These include an organization to support girls kidnapped and trafficked by Al-Shabaab terror group in Kenya, a number of groups supporting girls with disabilities in settings where they are extremely isolated —  such as in Nicaragua and DRC — organizations led by and supporting transgender communities in Benin, Ivory Coast and Uganda, and groups working with Roma communities in Serbia, Israel, and Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Centering the Leadership, Wisdom and Strategies of Young Feminist Activists

Across the world, mutual aid organizing is gaining traction among new and diverse audiences, and even in formalized institutions. Whether they know it or not, these communities are using the very organizing tools that girl activists and their feminist allies have been using for decades in their struggles for justice. Indeed, it has never been more important to learn from the leadership of the girls and young womxn who live through lockdowns, political uncertainty, and economic instability every day.  They are the ones we have been waiting for and they’ve been here all along.

Rather than becoming distracted by flashy technology, or formal funding, or government sanctioned solutions, now is the time to invest in young feminist leadership. As justice funders, we firmly push back against the usual noise around programmatic innovation and technocratic solutions in this crisis and beyond. We see these as typical ways to obscure the powerful work — led by girls and young womxn and their older feminist allies — that is already creating change. The Global Resilience Fund provides rapid resources in response to this moment, acknowledging the increased vulnerability these groups face but, crucially, it does this through flexible core grants to support the powerful organizing work that girls and young womxn are already doing every day to build worlds that are safe and healthy and free.

Participatory Funding: Putting Power into the Hands of Young Feminists

As activist funders, we know that we cannot remake the world unless those who live every day with injustice have access to the resources to define their own roadmaps to liberation. In many ways, philanthropy is predicated on the systems of harm that we are working to dismantle, with wealth generated through extractive capitalist practice that exploits the very communities philanthropy then seeks to support.  One (very small) way to redress these power imbalances is to put decision-making power into the hands of those doing the work. As well as offering a deeper connection to local contexts and movements, activist decision makers are able to read proposals and engage in collective decision making with a degree of nuance, expertise, intellectual rigor, love, and solidarity that is rarely seen at the traditional philanthropic decision making table.

Through participatory processes, we are funding groups who would likely have been shut out or overlooked, and yet who are often doing the most critical, transformational work. Beyond the function of grantmaking, we believe in ceding decision making power because we trust girls, young womxn, trans and non-binary youth. We trust their leadership, their instincts, and their deep and embodied understanding of this work. Indeed, who else should be making decisions about resourcing young feminist collectives if not them?

A Feminist and Participatory Approach

The participatory decision-making process we have developed for grantmaking for The Global Resilience Fund centers on a peer-led panel made up of young womxn, girls, and nonbinary activists coming from all corners of the world between the ages of 14 and 35. The panelists review applications and score proposals using a basic tool developed with a range of examples of participatory funding score guides and in consultation with activists. After this, the panelists come together regionally to review the results of the collective scoring and debate the regional realities together to form a final list of applications to be funded by that regional panel. Panelists are compensated for their work in each round, and we have also engaged panelists in translation tasks (the fund is administered in English, French, Spanish and Arabic), and translators are also paid.

Our first panel was recently held in June 2020, kicking off a process that is highly participatory in many ways, with partners sharing advice, co-creating the founding concept note and criteria of the fund, and giving advice on the process and planned collective learning sessions. Additionally, different partners are taking up the roles that make sense for them locally, in many cases seeking to support groups locally, directly driving the nature of participation and ensuring the response is embedded in local contexts and movements.

The panel was created through a process of drawing on the networks of Fund partners. Activists were asked to then complete a very short expression of interest with a few simple questions. The expression of interest was available in a multi-language online form, and as a downloadable document compatible with software used by those living with visual impairments.  The various partners and the team here at Purposeful reviewed and made decisions about who to invite to the panel by taking geographic, identity, issue, and movement diversity into account. The intentionally chosen board reflects the vast diversity of girls, young womxn, and trans youths’ identities. It includes Black members, members of color, members with disabilities, and members with a range of gender expressions and sexualities, religions, and ideologies. Already we are seeing powerful opportunities for panelists to connect and build relationships over the course of their involvement of the Fund. That is some of the magic of peer-led and participatory processes that cut across themes, movements, ages, and geography.

A Collective Process

In many ways, this unprecedented moment calls for a collective response that reaches across borders, movements, and issues areas.  Each of the Global Resilience Fund partners are supporting emergency and recovery work in their own contexts and through their own frames, many with their complementary local or regional funding windows. By pooling resources and expertise, we can reach new groups at a speed, scale, and depth we could not do alone while holding all the personal and organizational complexities of this pandemic. A brilliant example is the leadership of the Disability Rights Fund in the design and execution of our collective work. Thanks to their expertise, commitments, and mobilizing power we are reaching groups working at the intersection of disability rights, girls’ rights, and a range of other justice struggles including LGBTQIA2S movements; groups that are so often shut out from even applying for international funding opportunities like this.

The fund is in its essence collaborative and aims to embody the principles of feminist solidarity, co-created with different funders including womxn’s funds, international organizations and private foundations, leveraging and leaning into our collective strengths. As a temporary fund, being embedded in an existing ecosystem of funders committed to doing this work is part of its DNA.  It aims to be complementary to longer term funding mechanisms, as well as ongoing emergency funders such as the Urgent Action Funds for WHRs, moving core funding to young feminist activists for a finite period to respond to additional need and to ensure resources flow quickly to young feminists activists doing this work.

Beyond this moment, it seems essential that we learn and document what it takes to build and hold collective funding processes during times of crisis. Knowing what we do about the world, it is all too clear that we will be called on to do this again. As a group of funders, we are committed to learning and experimenting with what that might mean over the coming years.

As funders committed to justice and freedom for all girls and young womxn everywhere, we have an opportunity not only to respond to the needs of young feminists, but also to align our processes in complementary ways to grassroots organizing. This means applying an intersectional feminist lens, to learn across borders, issues, and identities, to center practices of collectivity, reciprocity, and transnational solidarity.  We also have an opportunity to connect to a range of justice movements where we know girls and young womxn are often organizing, but where their age, patriarchal norms, or other social factors keep them invisible. Supporting girls and young womxn with critical resources — especially young activists organizing outside of programmatic frames — is a first step in building a world where their critical contributions are seen and celebrated, in and across movements.

*The term womxn, used by some, especially in the intersectional feminist movement, is one of several alternative spellings of the English word woman. It is used by some feminists to avoid the spelling woman (which contains and derives from the word man), and to foreground transgender, nonbinary, and other marginalized women
Building Resilience through Participation with a New Global Fund

Categories

About the author(s)

Consultant
Global Women and Girls' Rights

Co-founder
Purposeful

This Moment in History: The Call for Philanthropy’s Transformation

Conversations regarding racial equity in the field of philanthropy have been growing for the last two decades. Amid a worldwide health pandemic that has gravely impacted Black and Brown communities, and the greatest civil unrest in recent history, our society’s complacency with state-sanctioned neglect and violence against Black bodies has become even more evident. Where has philanthropy’s advocacy been present in advancing our collective conversations around an anti-racism agenda?  As philanthropy wrestles with the sector’s willingness for accountable change, it is more evident that philanthropy’s espoused values of equity have essentially been absent from influencing the systemic and institutional racism that has plagued our communities.

We know philanthropic institutions, with their power, privilege, insularity, opacity, and risk-aversion also have been significant players in the problem---upholding and perpetuating the very attitudes and actions of oppression that we claim we are working against. The stark reality of death in front of us has been true for some time in other ways as well: the high infant mortality rate for Black babies and high murder rate for trans women of color across the country are two indicators of this. Our call to our philanthropic colleagues is that there is no longer time for a well-planned “dress rehearsal” for racial equity---we either support collective liberation for our communities or we do not.

Our communities are in desperate need of our bold leadership. We must become accountable to the people most impacted, influential where our power can be most leveraged, and humble in following the lead of community leadership, especially Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC).

a diverse group of young professionals working together on a project

These communities are not a monolith but encompass many intersectional and critical identities in addition to race/ethnicity:  immigrants, queer and trans folks, individuals with disabilities, and many more.

There are many calls to philanthropy in this time for how we can release more dollars into communities or be more intentional about our areas of investment, especially as it relates to centering the Black community and addressing anti-Black racism within the health and criminal justice sectors. In our philanthropic work over the past few years, the Kalamazoo Community Foundation has deepened our understanding of the “how” for advancing this type of work, which has allowed us to bring more intentionality into   strategies in this time. Two bodies of work that have been instrumental in this are our Anti-Racist Transformation Team (ARTT) focused on our internal operations and our Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation (TRHT) work externally focused on community-wide issues and strategies. The wisdom held in these spaces has taught us what authentic transformation of philanthropy can look like when we work and lead alongside community in reimagining shared power and accountability of an institution.

The following key principles for advancing racial equity in our transformation process have helped guide us. These lessons have informed our ability as an institution to pivot to the demands of this time (in some areas better than others) as well as ensured that we are building something sustainable and transformative beyond this moment. We share these with the acknowledgement and humility that these lessons have not come easily and are still very much in raw formation as we continue to “build the bike” as we ride it. No transformational journey is easy, linear, or without conflict and this reality is very true for us as we engage this work.

Round icon of two people greeting one another

Center Authentic and Accountable Relationships

More than ever, we are seeing how our humanity, suffering, and resilience are interwoven. For too long as philanthropic institutions, we have upheld formal relationships of power as gate keepers of resources, rather than working with community as co-creators and stewards of resources.

One of the most powerful aspects in the Kalamazoo Community Foundation’s internal and external racial equity work has been the transformative relationships with community, especially BIPOC, that we have built. Many of these have been unlikely relationships among people who may have never been directly connected otherwise but these relationships  have deeply impacted  the people involved.

Relationships have been the force that upholds our accountability to community in this work. These relationships allow us to better understand the diverse experiences across our community in a way that shapes our perceptions of issues and the solutions we advocate for. These relationships have forced a reimagining of a shifting power structure and they are the bedrock that sustains us as we navigate tension points that accompany our work. As a result, we have come to know deeper healing, learning, and understanding of our shared humanity despite other dominant narratives around race that strive to divide us further. Within philanthropy, these narratives play out in that People of Color, especially Black folks, are seen as not worthy of investment and issues of poverty or violence are often blamed on BIPOC. Philanthropy upholds the narrative of the “haves” and “have nots” through the White savior complex of who has power and resources to determine the life trajectories of our communities who have been most oppressed. Shifting our relationships with one another has invited us to live into re-envisioning a space where all belong and where BIPOC are not only present in the room, but their voices/perspectives are centered.

Specifically, during this time, the existing relationships with community manifested into regular gathering spaces and outreach phone calls with community leaders with the central questions:

  • How do we support each other and community in this time?
  • What resources are needed for frontline workers and organizers?
  • How do we have real accountability around inadequate services, actions of police, and key decision makers?

We at the Kalamazoo Community Foundation are currently asking ourselves what is the new infrastructure and decision-making processes that engages internal and external stakeholders to foster more shared power and to inform our strategy going forward.  We recognize that reimagining our power structure alongside community can lead to different funding strategies, advocacy, and policies in our work. Most recently, we have engaged community ARTT members in considering shifts in our current spending policy and TRHT members in informing actions on local issues of racism disproportionately impacting the Black community.

Icon of person with many outputs

Building the Infrastructure

Committed resources have been critical to institutionalizing these bodies of work inside our foundation--financial resources, staffing, organizational staff support, elevating the leadership of  Black, Indigenous, and People of Color and valuing the lived experience of  these individuals through paid community leadership have been essential. We cannot build a new system using the same playbook, staff, and skillsets we used before. We have learned that we have to train for it, recruit for it, prioritize it in our budgets, build decision-making processes that support it, and plan for it at all levels of the organization.

The infrastructure we have been building at KZCF means that we are ensuring that we have more leadership in place for accountability to assure that racial disparities and adaptations needed for COVID-19 have been kept on the radar of our larger communities’ responses. Our infrastructure has also allowed us to deepen conversations quickly, as we did during the uprising after George Floyd’s murder,  a working team in our Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation program already had work in progress focused on transformation of our criminal justice system. This allowed for quicker responses in collective statements at our local commission meetings speaking out against state-sanctioned violence against the Black community.

icon of person with lightbulb (idea)

Allow Strategies to Emerge

Book cover of emergent strategy by adrienne maree brownWe have learned that our racial equity work is not a static process or a set of policies to be adapted but a living body of work that is constantly evolving, growing, and emerging. Maintaining flexibility and organically allowing new strategies to emerge is critical. When working in deep relationship with community, the issues and potential solutions that are generated can be much greater than any goal, metric or strategy that was predetermined. Building in consistent reflection processes that elevate community voice and learning lead to a recognition of when these shifts are happening so we can better follow the community’s lead.

Activist adrienne maree brown  highlights this concept in her book Emergent Strategy: “We will adapt to change or become irrelevant.” As a philanthropic entity, we have to be with community in the unknown, in the non-linear path of growth, validating diverse cultural norms of doing work, and in transformation that is not easily quantifiable in numbers.

This means we must often challenge our socialized notion of “risk” and invest our resources creatively to test and allow new spaces for innovation to take shape. It means unlearning our socialization (both as oppressor and oppressed), consistently naming our biases, rethinking how we view impact and evaluation, and being open to sit in discomfort and uncertainty around the next phases of the work. Navigating these shifts and movements requires skilled leadership to bring everyone along and to uphold focus on the larger vision for a world that would be absent of the need for our philanthropy.

An emergent strategy lens in this moment has allowed for a re-focusing and re-imagining of our work in real time. Our Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation team recognized the critical need for healing and community connection through the launch of the Virtual Healing Project that has supported community healing processes in navigating COVID-19 as well as civil unrest. Hearing feedback about barriers to access, our grantmaking and finance staff were able to respond to a need from grassroots organizations by helping them apply for the Paycheck Protection Program – a response that happened within 24 hours. There was an expedited grant approval process for key grantees in need of immediate resources just as shelter-in-place orders hit. These newfound ways to act with urgency also laid the foundation for quick actions to renewed unrest after the killings of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor – we had already built spaces for virtual community dialogue and had tested a process to move resources more quickly.  Foundations have not been used to quick, nimble, and innovative action and yet our effectiveness on behalf of equitable community action demands it for us to stay relevant.

Illustration of mentoring and training concepts

Our Influence Goes Beyond Funding

While grants are often seen as our central function, we need to recognize our power and influence in other ways that can lead us to the change we want to see. We must ask ourselves additional questions:

  • How are our endowments invested and do these investments advance our goals of equity? [In 2019, the Kalamazoo Community Foundation established a Socially Responsible Investment option in order to increase alignment with our core values and equity priority.]
  • Do our processes and policies support power building in communities of color?
  • What community tables are we at and how are we leveraging those roles to influence decisions from a racial equity framework in our community?
  • How can we support and create opportunities for leadership from BIPOC who don’t often have a seat at the table?
  • What narratives can we share that will influence local media, philanthropists, and other decision-makers around an anti-racism and racial justice agenda?
  • How can we engage in advocacy work alongside community partners at the local and state levels?

Our sector is called to radically reimagine our relationship to power and our way of being in authentic partnership and accountability with communities of color. Philanthropy has a vital opportunity to be shaped by this moment—and to lead in this moment toward an agenda of justice for our communities. This is an opportunity to authentically center people, their livelihood, dignity, and human rights in a way that has too easily has been lost in our work and is essential for longer-term impact and sustainability of our racial equity work.  The lives and health of our communities are truly depending on it.

Questions for Reflection

  • How will this moment shape your foundation to institutionalize your equity commitments in different ways going forward?
  • What is the current state of your foundation’s relationship with communities of color? How will your relationship and accountability with communities of color look different toward greater transformation?

Additional Reading

COVID-19: Using a Racial Justice Lens Now to Transform Our Future (Lori Villarosa, Nonprofit Quarterly)

Have nonprofit and philanthropy become the “white moderate” that Dr. King warned us about? (Vu Le, NonprofitAF.com)

“We Must be in It for the Long Haul”: Black Foundation Executives Request Action by Philanthropy on Anti-Black Racism (ABFE, The Skillman Foundation Blog)

 

This Moment in History: The Call for Philanthropy’s Transformation

Categories

About the author(s)

Director for the Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation
Kalamazoo Community Foundation

Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
Kalamazoo Community Foundation

Doubling Down on a Philanthropic Challenge During a Pandemic

It all seemed so straightforward six months ago!

At the start of 2020, the WES Mariam Assefa Fund, the philanthropic arm of World Education Services (WES), partnered with the Tarsadia Foundation with the shared goal of supporting community-based organizations that work to uplift immigrants and refugees, particularly those working in low-wage jobs.

As relatively new funders, both Tarsadia and the Mariam Assefa Fund felt that a philanthropic challenge would be a strategic and exciting way to crowdsource ideas and build relationships with organizations working within immigrant communities nationwide. We wanted to hear from those working on the ground – and from communities themselves – about what is needed and what ideas had the greatest potential to make an impact. In partnership with Tarsadia, we decided to launch a funding initiative called the Opportunity Challenge: $1 Million to Uplift Immigrant Communities.

The experts at Social Strategy Associates (SSA) joined the team designing the challenge to contribute their considerable expertise to developing thoughtful (and thoughtfully executed) philanthropic prizes. Together, our joint team planned carefully for the challenge’s March 10 launch. We created detailed Gantt charts and nuanced evaluation matrices – all in pursuit of developing an inclusive, efficient process for interested organizations to share their ideas.

Today, we are thrilled to announce that 12 organizations have been awarded their full grant request; another eight semi-finalists received donations in recognition of their impressive work and the time invested in participating in the challenge. The total amount of the dollars awarded? $2 million.

If you’re reading carefully, you’ll note that we set out to award half that amount. What follows is the story of how we got to where we are today, and the bumps and adjustments along the way.

The March launch date for the Opportunity Challenge coincided with the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S., just as the potential scope of the crisis began to come into focus. This immediately raised numerous questions that all our matrices and Gantt charts had not prepared us for:

  • How would COVID-19 affect immigrant communities? How would it affect the front-line organizations working with those communities?
  • Would the organizations who most needed our support even be able to apply, or was the demand for their services too overwhelming?
  • Should we carry on as planned or should we postpone our challenge?
  • If we went forward, how could we ensure that the process worked for the organizations we hoped to attract?

We deliberated these questions while adjusting to the new realities of quarantine: remote work, social isolation, and a profound disruption to daily routine. Meanwhile, we watched with mounting concern as the impact on over 12 million immigrant and refugee workers – including those whose employers did not provide adequate protective equipment in their essential workplaces and those who saw their jobs disappear overnight, often with little or no access to social safety nets – became more and more devastatingly apparent.

The immediate and stark health and economic impacts quickly illuminated our path forward. We decided to push ahead with an even greater sense of urgency, adjusting the design of the program to match the realities on the ground.

Specifically, we implemented several operational changes to the challenge, all of which sought to accomplish two goals: first, minimizing the application burden on resourced-constrained community-based organizations that wanted to participate; and second, maximizing the benefits each participating organization received. We took four steps to achieve those goals:

  1. We simplified the application process and extended deadlines: We revisited our application form to make it faster and simpler for organizations to complete, making it easy for respondents to copy and paste responses from other grant requests in the first stage of the process. (We pushed the requirement for more tailored information to a later stage.) We also added flexibility to the application timeline, encouraging organizations to reach out should they need more time to submit their application beyond the stated deadline.
  2. We established open lines of communications: Despite our small team, we prioritized being accessible to applicants. We established “office hours” – 15-minute calls for prospective applicants to meet with a member of our team to ask questions and clarify whether their organization was a good fit for the initiative. We scheduled a webinar that was attended by more than 400 people. We responded to all emailed questions within 24 hours.
  3. We provided benefits to all applicants: In addition to creating a low barrier to entry, we wanted to offer real benefits to every organization that took time to apply. After identifying common areas of interest and need among applicants, we decided to develop a three-part storytelling workshop, which will run in October. The workshop will be open to all applicants to help them amplify their impact. We will also deliver a webinar on best practices in applying for open grant challenges and are sharing information about all applicants with other funders.
  4. We doubled the amount of funding awarded: When planning the Opportunity Challenge, we intended to select seven winners and award $1 million in funding. Given the sheer volume of interest – we received 470 applications from 40 states – and the overall quality of submissions, we reallocated budgets to fully leverage the initiative’s value and support all twenty organizations selected by the Opportunity Challenge’s incredible external selection committee; the committee believed these organizations had put forth the most impactful, community-centered ideas. In the end, we awarded two million dollars through the challenge, double what we initially planned.

Opportunity Challenge applicants say the changes made a difference. Fully 96% of 292 total respondents to a feedback survey reported a favorable experience. One applicant noted, “We appreciated the flexibility of the application. It was not onerous; if it had been, we would have had to pass up this opportunity.” Particularly gratifying for us was that 96% of those who reached out for support were satisfied or very satisfied by the support they received; none reported being dissatisfied.

The survey also enabled us to solicit feedback on areas for improvement in future grantmaking efforts. Suggestions included designing the application to allow applicants to complete different sections at their own pace, providing information on all the applicant benefits earlier in the process, and striking a better balance between open-ended and specific questions.

2020 has been a wild ride so far. We know that our funding is just a drop in the bucket for what’s needed to adequately support immigrant and refugees, especially now. We hope our experience this year provides some practical insights to other funders looking for ways to respond to the fast-moving events we’re all navigating. And we hope the outpouring of interest we received inspires other funders to avoid delaying their work in times of uncertainty and instead put a shoulder to the wheel.

Doubling Down on a Philanthropic Challenge During a Pandemic

Categories

About the author(s)

Senior Program Manager
World Education Services Mariam Assefa Fund

Senior Director
World Education Services Mariam Assefa Fund

Managing Director
Social Strategy Associates

Senior Associate
Social Strategy Associates

Philanthropy Responds to the Racial Equity Movement

A racial reckoning is upon us. The Black Lives Matter movement has rapidly expanded in the wake of highly publicized incidents of racist police violence. Mass mobilization in the streets of major cities as well as suburban and rural towns has taken form across the U.S. and around the world. Indeed, policing has been central in recent activism and calls to action across numerous sectors. But the moment upon us, which feels like a genuine inflection point, is shining a critical light on numerous dimensions of systemic racism, especially as it impacts Black communities.

It is not an accident that this moment is occurring during a pandemic. COVID-19 is demonstrating and deepening racial inequality in many aspects of life. In health, Black, Latinx, and indigenous populations are experiencing disproportionate infections and deaths. In education, students in traditionally under-resourced schools, largely of color, are falling further behind. In economics, jobless rates have been higher for people of color in the midst of a substantial disruption to already vulnerable circumstances in which Black communities have been beset with centuries of limited wealth.

On so many levels, the various faces of systemic racism have been more broadly visible in 2020. Philanthropy as a sector is no exception. However, philanthropy has been on a slow path toward greater efforts to confront racism and pursue racial equity in recent years. An increasing number of foundations and Philanthropy Serving Organizations (PSOs) have been, at the very least, more curious about racial equity since 2016. The actions of the past several weeks exhibit some willingness to change. But, will philanthropy experience its own sustained movement for racial equity and racial justice?  If so, what would be required to make this a reality?

Some Evidence of Increased Anti-Racist Commitments

In recent weeks, a number of foundations sharpened and expanded their commitment to racial equity and racial justice. A substantial number of these commitments have been made only as  statements. But we are also seeing increased giving to Black-led racial justice.

Some foundations have not only increased giving, but raised awareness about these organizations:

A number of foundations have been organizing convenings:

  • The Lumina Foundation supported a partnership between three Historically Black Colleges and Universities to improve student retention and graduation rates. The foundation organized a webinar with the presidents of the three HBCUs to discuss how they are leading during the COVID-19 pandemic and nationwide calls for racial justice.
  • The W.K. Kellogg Foundation organized a virtual National Day of Racial Healing: Healing in Action event on June 25 in response to the intensifying police violence against Black men and women.
  • The San Francisco Foundation, The California Endowment, and The Stuart Foundation partnered with Northern California Grantmakers to organize Shaping the Moment into a Movement: Black Youth Voice and Leadership. The event provided an opportunity to hear from Black youth leaders and directors about the needs and priorities that are essential to shaping this moment into a movement and the concrete ways that funders can step up.

One important aspect of racial justice that will be increasingly significant in the coming months is voter participation:

  • The Langeloth Foundation announced that it will deploy $10 million to support civic participation for Black voters and voters of color who are disproportionately targeted by voter suppression and oppressive policing tactics. This new $10 million investment is a significant portion of the Langeloth Foundation’s $88 million endowment.

In the midst of COVID-19, an economic crisis, and a historical reckoning with systemic racism, a number of foundations are increasing giving, or finding creative ways to access capital that can be channeled into grantmaking.

  • The Ford Foundation’s Board authorized an increase of up to $1 billion in giving, financed through the sale of bonds, to help stabilize and strengthen nonprofits that are fighting against inequality and injustice and leading communities through a post-coronavirus recovery. The W.K. Kellogg Foundation has also joined with the Ford Foundation and three other foundations to commit to expanding payout over the next two years, and will give up to $300 million. Combined, the five foundations are pledging over $1.7 billion in new resources.
  • The Andrew Mellon Foundation is adjusting its mission to give greater emphasis in grantmaking to programs that promote social justice. The new mission will focus on building “just communities enriched by meaning and empowered by critical thinking where ideas and imagination can thrive.” As part of this effort they have created a $5.3 million program to distribute curated books to prisons across the country.
  • Several foundations and individual donors have signed an open letter calling for an Emergency Charity Stimulus Bill to mandate increased payout for private foundations from 5 to 10 percent over the next three years and to mandate the same payout requirement for Donor Advised Funds.
  • The James Irvine Foundation’s board approved exceeding their grantmaking budget to allow an additional $20 million to support efforts to end anti-Black racism and advance racial equity in California’s systems of economic opportunity. They will simultaneously develop a strategy for long-term and deeper support for racial equity efforts in their grantmaking initiatives and operations.
  • The Rockefeller Foundation has pledged an initial $10 million to launch the Rockefeller Opportunity Collective. The funds will be allocated to a collective of government, business, faith-based, and non-profit partners in 10 cities over 10 years to protect communities from displacement and eliminate barriers to access capital and credit among low-wage workers and small businesses operated by women, Black, and Latinx owners.
  • The Brooklyn Community Foundation’s Board of Directors approved a 7 percent drawdown from the Foundation’s endowment for the next fiscal year to ensure that during this volatile time, their nonprofit partners will not lose support.
  • The Libra Foundation is doubling their grantmaking to $50 million in 2020 in order to use this historic opportunity to address systemic racism.

Beyond grantmaking, some foundations have directly addressed how to increase impact investing to combat systemic racism:

  • Several foundations are signatories to the 2020 Belonging Pledge: A Commitment to Advance Racial Equity, which focuses on investing with a racial equity lens. Signatories committed to discussing racial equity at their next investment committee meeting and moving an agenda forward that includes next steps and results sharing.

Recently, a number of community foundations have been establishing funds to support initiatives in their localities with specific attention to race and organizations led by and serving Black and other communities of color:

  • The Seattle Foundation, which houses the COVID-19 Response Fund, announced it will award $9.2 million in grants from the Response Fund to more than 200 community organizations and prioritize Black-led and Black-serving nonprofits who are navigating growing needs.
  • The Seattle Foundation is also housing the Black Future Co-op Fund. The Fund will be a collective hub for efforts to eradicate poverty, build generational wealth, preserve Black Culture, and celebrate the incredible resilience of the Black community. Its architects are four Black women leaders with long histories working to support the Black community across Washington state.
  • The East Bay Community Foundation along with The City of Oakland’s Cultural Affairs Division, and Akondadi Foundation announced the launch of Belonging In Oakland: A Just City Cultural Fund. This is a new multi-year program that will fund Oakland cultural practitioners of color to radically imagine a racially just city. In the first year, the Fund will award approximately $300,000 for up to 12 grants of $25,000 to support ideas for what a racially just Oakland could look like.
  • The Brooklyn Community Foundation prioritizes support for grassroots organizations led by Black people and other people of color as part of their institutional commitment to racial justice. Additionally, they are committed to investing in Black and POC leaders to ensure they have the support they need to fight for change.

Considering Long Term Commitments

This is an extraordinary year that is challenging philanthropy to respond accordingly.  But questions remain about long term commitments. There is no short-term strategy that can adequately dismantle systemic racism. Some foundations are grappling with how to develop longer term programming. For example:

  • The California Endowment released a statement in which they committed themselves to specifically undertake a decade-long investment in community “power-building” and increasing investment in Black-led organizing, advocacy and movement building organizations. Additionally, they will track and report publicly on funding to communities of color and Black-led organizations, develop an explicit strategy to use impact investing tools to contribute to Black economic development, and create a new Director of Advancing Racial Equity reporting directly to the President and CEO. They are also creating a President’s Youth Council, to be comprised of youth who identify as Black, African American, Native/Indigenous, Asian, and Pacific Islander, who are engaged in social justice and health equity. They will serve in partnership with the CEO of the Foundation to shape its investment and culture.
  • The Rockefeller Brothers Fund announced that it will increase its annual spending to allocate an additional $48 million over the next five years to address critical system failures that underlie both COVID-19 and the enduring racial justice crisis. The spending plan includes $10 million for a new program focusing on racial justice that will identify systemic advances and fundamental changes in policy to dismantle structural racism.
  • Open Society Foundation is supporting what they call the “nation’s historic movement towards racial justice” by announcing investments totaling $220 million in emerging organizations and leaders building power in Black communities across the country.

Many will watch closely to see if a larger number of foundations institute multi-year commitments. In this moment, foundations are challenged to assess what they have done to date, determine what they can do now, and re-imagine for the long run. It is this third dimension that will provide us an indication of whether we are going to see a philanthropic movement toward racial equity and justice.

Philanthropy Responds to the Racial Equity Movement

Categories

About the author(s)

Founder and President
Marga Inc.

Bringing Southern U.S. Grantees Together to Drive Progress Against HIV/AIDS

The U.S. South has never received funding proportional to its burden of HIV and AIDS, whether from the government or private resources. In 2017, to address the complexities of the epidemic in this region, Funders Concerned About AIDS (FCAA) brought together a group of grantmakers including Gilead Sciences, Ford Foundation, the Elton John AIDS Foundation, ViiV Healthcare, and Johnson and Johnson, forming a first-of-its-kind funding collaborative: the Southern HIV Impact Fund. Managed by AIDS United, the Fund aims to increase resources directed to the region and act as a catalyst for progress.

One way it does this is by engaging organizations that are new to HIV work but that have a deep history and broad reach among affected populations. This helps to ensure that those most impacted are able to play a vital role in identifying effective solutions. The Fund is also working to build a pipeline of new leaders through its 10-person, year-long cohort learning experience that more accurately reflects the current face of the epidemic — Black, Latinx, queer, and transgender.

As a program manager for the Fund, my first order of business was building community among and between grantee organizations—organizations that had varying perspectives and levels of understanding about the epidemic. Funders knew that a grantee convening early in the cohort’s establishment would help foster meaningful collaboration, not only amongst grantees but also the grantmakers. A convening would also create space for grantees to learn from each other and build cross-regional networks for support and enhance the cohort’s understanding of HIV in the South and learn more about intersecting barriers that impact their ability to effectively address the epidemic.

We scheduled this event to take place within the first four months of the grant cycle and prioritized the need to develop strategies around the most entrenched structural barriers. Some obstacles to accessing HIV treatment and support including poverty, limited educational opportunities, stigma, racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, and inequitable access to insurance and specialized care. By convening the grantees early on, those with specific focuses, such as racial or social justice, were better able to see how their efforts to advance these causes could mitigate barriers to HIV prevention and care. Similarly, organizations focused on the provision of HIV services were able to identify specific opportunities for cross-sector collaboration and intersectional interventions.

The meeting began with a session on using and implementing “people-first” language—emphasizing the individual over their health issue. Attendees learned about the historical, cultural, and societal links between language, policy decisions, and allocation of resources. They engaged around ways that language can be empowering and ways to use it to challenge rather than reinforce inequitable relationships and power dynamics. Attendees left with tangible ways of implementing these learnings, including one attendee who shared, "I will be conducting a language audit to see how and where I may be more self-aware of the powerful role of language in perpetuating stigma and layers of oppression." Painting of a person on a wall with raised fist in the air, surrounded by words of empowerment.

Another session focused on integrating healing justice into an organization’s service delivery, providing tools to assess the grantees’ mental health literacy and devising strategies to implement trauma-informed care and policies into their work. An increasingly popular area of research and practice, grantees were engaged and eager to learn more about this sensitive topic. One attendee vowed to, "be more introspective to people's needs to heal. Evaluating my own traumas and how they create bias in my work."

The grantee convening is indicative of the way the Southern HIV Impact Fund approaches its work – by focusing on the values of equity and social justice and by evaluating everything from the perspective of the individuals on the front-line. I am excited to share that progress has already been made as the first round of grants is outpacing overall HIV-related philanthropy in the U.S. South in three key areas of strategic investment: people of color, LGBTQ communities, and leadership development/ capacity building. The Fund is directing funds well over that which has historically been driven toward HIV-related philanthropy in the U.S. South and by the end of the grant year, the Fund will have mobilized a total of $300,000 in rapid response grantmaking to address urgent needs across the region.

To date, the Southern HIV Impact Fund has:

  • Made an initial investment of $2.65 million in support of 37 grantee organizations.
  • Reached nine deeply impacted states: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas.
  • Mobilized more than $200K in rapid response grants, including emergency support for organizations serving people with HIV in regions devasted by hurricanes.
  • Trained 10 established and emerging leaders from Southern communities working to end HIV in the South.

As the Fund begins its second year, we will build on efforts to combat the structural systems and societal norms that pose significant obstacles to accessing HIV treatment and support. Our hope is that other grantmakers will see opportunities to partner in this effort and learn from what we learned with our grantees. Together, we can expand the reach and impact of our work and change an unjust HIV/AIDS equation in the U.S. South by putting grantees in this region first.

Editor’s Note: The Southern HIV Impact Fund will be featured on a panel – Catalyzing Communities: Strengthening Philanthropic Funding for Community Action on AIDS – at the upcoming FCAA AIDS Philanthropy Summit. GrantCraft’s director Jen Bokoff (@jenbo1) will moderate.

About the author(s)

Program Manager,
AIDS United

Deciding Together Shifting Power and Resources Through Participatory Grantmaking

Funders are increasingly looking to engage the communities they serve in the grantmaking process, but there are few resources about how to do so. In this guide, we explore how funders can engage in participatory grantmaking and cede decision-making power about funding decisions to the very communities they aim to serve. Deciding Together: Shifting Power and Resources Through Participatory Grantmaking illustrates why and how funders around the world are engaging in this practice that is shifting traditional power dynamics in philanthropy. Created with input from a number of participatory grantmakers, the guide shares challenges, lessons learned, and best practices for engaging in inclusive grantmaking.

Funding for this guide was generously provided by the Ford Foundation and Open Society Foundations. This guide is part of GrantCraft's content series on participatory grantmaking. Help us get the word out on Twitter and beyond, and follow the conversation using the hashtag #ShiftThePower. You can also read our press release here.

Download a Word version of the guide here.

What's in the guide?

  • Nothing About Us Without Us. This vignette shares an example of why and how participatory grantmaking became the approach for an international effort to fund persons with disabilities.
  • Participatory Grantmaking: What Is It? There is no formal definition for participatory grantmaking, but there are agreed-upon tenets that distinguish this approach. We begin this guide by providing context about the practice and defining the underlying values.
  • The Core Elements of Participatory Grantmaking. This section outlines the core elements of participatory grantmaking and describes the ethos and values that support this approach.
  • The Benefits of Participatory Grantmaking. Here, we explore the rationale leading funders to embrace this practice. For many, the values and core elements are a part of the benefits.
  • The Challenges of Participatory Grantmaking. All philanthropic approaches have challenges, and participatory grantmaking is no exception. Recognizing and iterating on these challenges is part of the approach itself.
  • Who Decides and How? This section presents the decisions that are made along the way and shares how different participatory grantmakers assign roles and determine who has power over what.
  • The Mechanics. No two foundations look exactly the same—take a look at a few models of participatory grantmaking and review questions to guide conversation about structure.
  • Evaluation. Participatory grantmaking is process-oriented, iterative, and difficult to codify. Yet, participatory grantmakers seek to achieve and evaluate outcomes. This section outlines the hurdles and approaches that exist.
  • Walking the Talk: Embedding Participation Internally. This section explains why a participatory ethos should be embedded in processes beyond just grantmaking decisions.
  • Getting Started. Funders can begin their journey to embracing the values and practice of participatory grantmaking through a variety of strategies, touched on here.
  • Appendix and Endnotes. These resources support information found throughout the guide and can be used to explore in greater depth.

About the author(s)

Principal
Cynthesis Consulting

Director of Stakeholder Engagement
Candid

About the author(s)

Principal
Cynthesis Consulting

Director of Stakeholder Engagement
Candid

Funders are increasingly looking to engage the communities they serve in the grantmaking process, but there are few resources about how to do so. In this guide, we explore how funders can engage in participatory grantmaking and cede decision-making power about funding decisions to the very communities they aim to serve. Deciding Together: Shifting Power and Resources Through Participatory Grantmaking illustrates why and how funders around the world are engaging in this practice that is shifting traditional power dynamics in philanthropy. Created with input from a number of participatory grantmakers, the guide shares challenges, lessons learned, and best practices for engaging in inclusive grantmaking.

Funding for this guide was generously provided by the Ford Foundation and Open Society Foundations. This guide is part of GrantCraft's content series on participatory grantmaking. Help us get the word out on Twitter and beyond, and follow the conversation using the hashtag #ShiftThePower. You can also read our press release here.

Download a Word version of the guide here.

What's in the guide?

  • Nothing About Us Without Us. This vignette shares an example of why and how participatory grantmaking became the approach for an international effort to fund persons with disabilities.
  • Participatory Grantmaking: What Is It? There is no formal definition for participatory grantmaking, but there are agreed-upon tenets that distinguish this approach. We begin this guide by providing context about the practice and defining the underlying values.
  • The Core Elements of Participatory Grantmaking. This section outlines the core elements of participatory grantmaking and describes the ethos and values that support this approach.
  • The Benefits of Participatory Grantmaking. Here, we explore the rationale leading funders to embrace this practice. For many, the values and core elements are a part of the benefits.
  • The Challenges of Participatory Grantmaking. All philanthropic approaches have challenges, and participatory grantmaking is no exception. Recognizing and iterating on these challenges is part of the approach itself.
  • Who Decides and How? This section presents the decisions that are made along the way and shares how different participatory grantmakers assign roles and determine who has power over what.
  • The Mechanics. No two foundations look exactly the same—take a look at a few models of participatory grantmaking and review questions to guide conversation about structure.
  • Evaluation. Participatory grantmaking is process-oriented, iterative, and difficult to codify. Yet, participatory grantmakers seek to achieve and evaluate outcomes. This section outlines the hurdles and approaches that exist.
  • Walking the Talk: Embedding Participation Internally. This section explains why a participatory ethos should be embedded in processes beyond just grantmaking decisions.
  • Getting Started. Funders can begin their journey to embracing the values and practice of participatory grantmaking through a variety of strategies, touched on here.
  • Appendix and Endnotes. These resources support information found throughout the guide and can be used to explore in greater depth.
 

About the author(s)

Principal
Cynthesis Consulting

Director of Stakeholder Engagement
Candid

Decidiendo Juntos Transferencia de poder y recursos mediante el proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos

En este documento titulado “Decidiendo juntos: Transferencia de poder y recursos mediante el proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos”, examinamos por qué y cómo implementan los donantes la asignación participativa de donativos y transfieren el poder a las comunidades que reciben el impacto de sus decisiones de financiamiento. Con ejemplos y reflexiones de un grupo diverso de donantes, exploramos los beneficios, los desafíos y los modelos del enfoque participativo de financiamiento.

El financiamiento para esta guía fue otorgado generosamente por la Fundación Ford y la Iniciativa Open Society para Europa. Twitter: #ShiftThePower.

  • ¿En qué consiste el proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos? No existe una definición formal de asignación participativa de donativos, pero sí algunos principios consensuados que distinguen dicho enfoque. La guía empieza por presentar el contexto de la práctica y por definir los valores subyacentes.
  • Elementos medulares del otorgamiento participativo de donativos. En esta sección se plantean los elementos centrales del proceso participativo de entrega de donativos y se describen el espíritu y los valores que fundamentan el enfoque.
  • Beneficios del proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos. En esta sección exploramos la lógica que lleva a los donantes a adoptar esta práctica. Para muchos de ellos, los valores y los elementos medulares forman parte de los beneficios.
  • Desafíos del proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos. Todo enfoque filantrópico plantea retos y el proceso participativo de financiamiento no es la excepción. Reconocer los desafíos y efectuar los ajustes correspondientes forma parte del proceso en sí.
  • ¿Quién decide y de qué manera? Esta sección presenta las decisiones que se toman durante el proceso y ofrece detalles sobre la manera en que los distintos donantes participativos asignan roles y determinan quién tiene poder y sobre qué.
  • La mecánica. Ninguna fundación es exactamente igual a otra. Analice los modelos de financiamiento participativo aquí presentados y revise las preguntas dirigidas a orientar la conversación en materia de estructuras.
  • Evaluación. La entrega participativa de donativos se basa en un proceso, es iterativa y difícil de codificar. Sin embargo, los donantes que utilizan dicho enfoque desean lograr resultados y evaluarlos. En esta sección describimos los obstáculos y perspectivas existentes.
  • Pasar del dicho al hecho: Incorporar la participación a nivel interno. Esta sección explica por qué se debe incorporar un espíritu participativo a los procesos, no solamente a las decisiones sobre entrega de financiamiento.
  • Cómo empezar​. Los donantes pueden iniciar el proceso de adopción de valores y prácticas de un enfoque participativo de asignación de donativos por medio de las distintas estrategias aquí mencionadas.
  • Apéndice y notas al final. Los recursos presentados en estas secciones refuerzan la información presentada a lo largo de toda la guía y se pueden emplear para explorar los temas con mayor profundidad.

En este documento titulado “Decidiendo juntos: Transferencia de poder y recursos mediante el proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos”, examinamos por qué y cómo implementan los donantes la asignación participativa de donativos y transfieren el poder a las comunidades que reciben el impacto de sus decisiones de financiamiento. Con ejemplos y reflexiones de un grupo diverso de donantes, exploramos los beneficios, los desafíos y los modelos del enfoque participativo de financiamiento.

El financiamiento para esta guía fue otorgado generosamente por la Fundación Ford y la Iniciativa Open Society para Europa. Twitter: #ShiftThePower.

  • ¿En qué consiste el proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos? No existe una definición formal de asignación participativa de donativos, pero sí algunos principios consensuados que distinguen dicho enfoque. La guía empieza por presentar el contexto de la práctica y por definir los valores subyacentes.
  • Elementos medulares del otorgamiento participativo de donativos. En esta sección se plantean los elementos centrales del proceso participativo de entrega de donativos y se describen el espíritu y los valores que fundamentan el enfoque.
  • Beneficios del proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos. En esta sección exploramos la lógica que lleva a los donantes a adoptar esta práctica. Para muchos de ellos, los valores y los elementos medulares forman parte de los beneficios.
  • Desafíos del proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos. Todo enfoque filantrópico plantea retos y el proceso participativo de financiamiento no es la excepción. Reconocer los desafíos y efectuar los ajustes correspondientes forma parte del proceso en sí.
  • ¿Quién decide y de qué manera? Esta sección presenta las decisiones que se toman durante el proceso y ofrece detalles sobre la manera en que los distintos donantes participativos asignan roles y determinan quién tiene poder y sobre qué.
  • La mecánica. Ninguna fundación es exactamente igual a otra. Analice los modelos de financiamiento participativo aquí presentados y revise las preguntas dirigidas a orientar la conversación en materia de estructuras.
  • Evaluación. La entrega participativa de donativos se basa en un proceso, es iterativa y difícil de codificar. Sin embargo, los donantes que utilizan dicho enfoque desean lograr resultados y evaluarlos. En esta sección describimos los obstáculos y perspectivas existentes.
  • Pasar del dicho al hecho: Incorporar la participación a nivel interno. Esta sección explica por qué se debe incorporar un espíritu participativo a los procesos, no solamente a las decisiones sobre entrega de financiamiento.
  • Cómo empezar​. Los donantes pueden iniciar el proceso de adopción de valores y prácticas de un enfoque participativo de asignación de donativos por medio de las distintas estrategias aquí mencionadas.
  • Apéndice y notas al final. Los recursos presentados en estas secciones refuerzan la información presentada a lo largo de toda la guía y se pueden emplear para explorar los temas con mayor profundidad.
 

Insight on Participatory Grantmaking: Diana Samarasan, Disability Rights Fund

Diana Samarasan talks about why funders should give up decision-making power to those impacted by grants, rather than just getting their input and making the final call yourself. She talks about why this form of grantmaking is necessary for the disability rights movement.

(Check out a detailed breakdown of how the Disability Rights Fund engages in this work here. For the full repository of mechanics, click here.)

Categories

Insight on Participatory Grantmaking: Mutisya Leonard, UHAI EASHRI

Mutisya Leonard from UHAI EASHRI, an LGBT and sex-worker fund based in East Africa, answers two questions related to participatory grantmaking: What led to the formation of your participatory fund? What structure and flexibility do you incorporate into your granting criteria?

(Check out a detailed breakdown of how the UHAI EASHRI engages in this work here. For the full repository of mechanics, click here.) 

Categories