Comment Philanthropie Communautaire bascule t-elle le pouvoir: Comment les donateurs peuvent contribuer à la réalisation de cela

Alors que des slogans tels que «think globally, act locally» (Refléchir globalement, agir localement) existent depuis des décennies, il y a tellement de fois encore que la décision sur la philanthropie et l’aide au développement se passe entre les intervenants extérieurs. Même les bailleurs de fonds qui tiennent véritablement à défendre le leadership et les initiatives locaux ont souvent du mal à renoncer au pouvoir. Ce document vise à aborder cette lutte avec des exemples concrets. Il a été commissioner par la Global Alliance for Community Philanthropy (l’Alliance mondiale pour la philanthropie communautaire) et le Global Fund for Community Foundations (Fonds mondial pour les fondations communautaires).

#ShiftThePower

Table des matières

  • Philanthropie communautaire: contexte pour partager et déléguer le pouvoir
  • Philanthropie communautaire, un concept: Historique et définitions
  • Quelques indications générales pour les donateurs
  • Les subventions pour accroitre la philanthropie communautaire et basculer le pouvoir
  • Aligner les valeurs et pratiques de la philanthropie communautaire au sein de votre institution de financement
  • Construire le secteur de philanthropie communautaire
  • Conclusion

About the author(s)

Executive Director
Global Fund for Community Foundations

Principal
Anna Pond Consulting

Teaming Up For Advocacy How To Effectively Use A Collaborative To Drive Change

This guide captures the wisdom of philanthropic leaders who have participated in multi-party advocacy collaboratives. It synthesizes information to dig deeper and understand the pain points and levers of success tied to funding advocacy and donor collaboratives.

The series is intended for both seasoned funders looking to troubleshoot and strengthen work they’re doing in an existing advocacy collaborative, as well as funders thinking of dipping their toes in the water. Each bite-sized chapter is intended to make this work easy to reference and share, and to read as a full body of work or in pieces.

What's in the guide?

  • Introduction. These framing thoughts share why funding advocacy is too often “the philanthropic road not yet taken” yet is likely to lead to the kind of change philanthropy seeks.
  • What Are the Benefits of Being Part of an Advocacy Collaborative? Grantmakers are remarkably consistent about the benefits of participating in advocacy collaboratives. Here we explore the rationale leading funders to embrace this strategy.
  • What Makes Advocacy Collaboratives Successful? This section outlines the key insights to successful advocacy collaboratives and how they contribute to stronger relationship building and effective grantmaking.
  • Types of Advocacy Collaboratives. There are many forms to collaboratives and this section walks through a few formats and how they lend to different challenges and benefits.
  • Groupthink. Collaboratives can be proactive in building preventive measures about groupthink into their processes from the get-go—this section digs into how.
  • Personality Conflicts. This section talks about how to overcome an inevitable sticking point: personality conflicts. While this issue exists in many contexts, it can have unique consequences for policy collaboratives.
  • Agreeing to Strategies. Achieving goals as a group can be overwhelming. There are several tactics and strategies funder collaboratives use to move the policy needle.
  • Does Size Matter? Because policy work occurs across multiple levels, it is important that advocacy collaboratives involve and consider grantmakers working across multiple points.
  • Grantee Roles and Relationships. This section highlights how grantees play a key role in the work of advocacy collaboratives and the necessity of addressing power imbalances between grantmakers and grantees.
  • Do We Need Staffing? The most effective advocacy collaboratives are staffed in some way and there are several advantages to that. This section highlights what those are and how to get there.
  • Chasing the Money. Like any fundraising, there can exist tension between the need to secure funding and maintaining a commitment to mission. This section discusses the balance of the two.
  • “My Foundations is Nervous About Policy Advocacy” Even in funder collaboratives, there can exist feelings of worry or limitations to what funders can support. This section provides tips on how to move through those or decide what is the best role for a funder to play.
  • Tool: Decision-Making Tree This tool is a guide for prospective funders considering if joining or establishing an advocacy funder collaborative is right for them, and if so, what structure it can take.

About the author(s)

Principal
Cynthesis Consulting

Director of Stakeholder Engagement
Candid

This guide captures the wisdom of philanthropic leaders who have participated in multi-party advocacy collaboratives. It synthesizes information to dig deeper and understand the pain points and levers of success tied to funding advocacy and donor collaboratives. Each bite-sized chapter is intended to make this work easy to reference and share, and to read as a full body of work or in pieces.

 

About the author(s)

Principal
Cynthesis Consulting

Director of Stakeholder Engagement
Candid

Deciding Together Shifting Power and Resources Through Participatory Grantmaking

Funders are increasingly looking to engage the communities they serve in the grantmaking process, but there are few resources about how to do so. In this guide, we explore how funders can engage in participatory grantmaking and cede decision-making power about funding decisions to the very communities they aim to serve. Deciding Together: Shifting Power and Resources Through Participatory Grantmaking illustrates why and how funders around the world are engaging in this practice that is shifting traditional power dynamics in philanthropy. Created with input from a number of participatory grantmakers, the guide shares challenges, lessons learned, and best practices for engaging in inclusive grantmaking.

Funding for this guide was generously provided by the Ford Foundation and Open Society Foundations. This guide is part of GrantCraft's content series on participatory grantmaking. Help us get the word out on Twitter and beyond, and follow the conversation using the hashtag #ShiftThePower. You can also read our press release here.

Download a Word version of the guide here.

What's in the guide?

  • Nothing About Us Without Us. This vignette shares an example of why and how participatory grantmaking became the approach for an international effort to fund persons with disabilities.
  • Participatory Grantmaking: What Is It? There is no formal definition for participatory grantmaking, but there are agreed-upon tenets that distinguish this approach. We begin this guide by providing context about the practice and defining the underlying values.
  • The Core Elements of Participatory Grantmaking. This section outlines the core elements of participatory grantmaking and describes the ethos and values that support this approach.
  • The Benefits of Participatory Grantmaking. Here, we explore the rationale leading funders to embrace this practice. For many, the values and core elements are a part of the benefits.
  • The Challenges of Participatory Grantmaking. All philanthropic approaches have challenges, and participatory grantmaking is no exception. Recognizing and iterating on these challenges is part of the approach itself.
  • Who Decides and How? This section presents the decisions that are made along the way and shares how different participatory grantmakers assign roles and determine who has power over what.
  • The Mechanics. No two foundations look exactly the same—take a look at a few models of participatory grantmaking and review questions to guide conversation about structure.
  • Evaluation. Participatory grantmaking is process-oriented, iterative, and difficult to codify. Yet, participatory grantmakers seek to achieve and evaluate outcomes. This section outlines the hurdles and approaches that exist.
  • Walking the Talk: Embedding Participation Internally. This section explains why a participatory ethos should be embedded in processes beyond just grantmaking decisions.
  • Getting Started. Funders can begin their journey to embracing the values and practice of participatory grantmaking through a variety of strategies, touched on here.
  • Appendix and Endnotes. These resources support information found throughout the guide and can be used to explore in greater depth.

About the author(s)

Principal
Cynthesis Consulting

Director of Stakeholder Engagement
Candid

About the author(s)

Principal
Cynthesis Consulting

Director of Stakeholder Engagement
Candid

Funders are increasingly looking to engage the communities they serve in the grantmaking process, but there are few resources about how to do so. In this guide, we explore how funders can engage in participatory grantmaking and cede decision-making power about funding decisions to the very communities they aim to serve. Deciding Together: Shifting Power and Resources Through Participatory Grantmaking illustrates why and how funders around the world are engaging in this practice that is shifting traditional power dynamics in philanthropy. Created with input from a number of participatory grantmakers, the guide shares challenges, lessons learned, and best practices for engaging in inclusive grantmaking.

Funding for this guide was generously provided by the Ford Foundation and Open Society Foundations. This guide is part of GrantCraft's content series on participatory grantmaking. Help us get the word out on Twitter and beyond, and follow the conversation using the hashtag #ShiftThePower. You can also read our press release here.

Download a Word version of the guide here.

What's in the guide?

  • Nothing About Us Without Us. This vignette shares an example of why and how participatory grantmaking became the approach for an international effort to fund persons with disabilities.
  • Participatory Grantmaking: What Is It? There is no formal definition for participatory grantmaking, but there are agreed-upon tenets that distinguish this approach. We begin this guide by providing context about the practice and defining the underlying values.
  • The Core Elements of Participatory Grantmaking. This section outlines the core elements of participatory grantmaking and describes the ethos and values that support this approach.
  • The Benefits of Participatory Grantmaking. Here, we explore the rationale leading funders to embrace this practice. For many, the values and core elements are a part of the benefits.
  • The Challenges of Participatory Grantmaking. All philanthropic approaches have challenges, and participatory grantmaking is no exception. Recognizing and iterating on these challenges is part of the approach itself.
  • Who Decides and How? This section presents the decisions that are made along the way and shares how different participatory grantmakers assign roles and determine who has power over what.
  • The Mechanics. No two foundations look exactly the same—take a look at a few models of participatory grantmaking and review questions to guide conversation about structure.
  • Evaluation. Participatory grantmaking is process-oriented, iterative, and difficult to codify. Yet, participatory grantmakers seek to achieve and evaluate outcomes. This section outlines the hurdles and approaches that exist.
  • Walking the Talk: Embedding Participation Internally. This section explains why a participatory ethos should be embedded in processes beyond just grantmaking decisions.
  • Getting Started. Funders can begin their journey to embracing the values and practice of participatory grantmaking through a variety of strategies, touched on here.
  • Appendix and Endnotes. These resources support information found throughout the guide and can be used to explore in greater depth.
 

About the author(s)

Principal
Cynthesis Consulting

Director of Stakeholder Engagement
Candid

Decidiendo Juntos Transferencia de poder y recursos mediante el proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos

En este documento titulado “Decidiendo juntos: Transferencia de poder y recursos mediante el proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos”, examinamos por qué y cómo implementan los donantes la asignación participativa de donativos y transfieren el poder a las comunidades que reciben el impacto de sus decisiones de financiamiento. Con ejemplos y reflexiones de un grupo diverso de donantes, exploramos los beneficios, los desafíos y los modelos del enfoque participativo de financiamiento.

El financiamiento para esta guía fue otorgado generosamente por la Fundación Ford y la Iniciativa Open Society para Europa. Twitter: #ShiftThePower.

  • ¿En qué consiste el proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos? No existe una definición formal de asignación participativa de donativos, pero sí algunos principios consensuados que distinguen dicho enfoque. La guía empieza por presentar el contexto de la práctica y por definir los valores subyacentes.
  • Elementos medulares del otorgamiento participativo de donativos. En esta sección se plantean los elementos centrales del proceso participativo de entrega de donativos y se describen el espíritu y los valores que fundamentan el enfoque.
  • Beneficios del proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos. En esta sección exploramos la lógica que lleva a los donantes a adoptar esta práctica. Para muchos de ellos, los valores y los elementos medulares forman parte de los beneficios.
  • Desafíos del proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos. Todo enfoque filantrópico plantea retos y el proceso participativo de financiamiento no es la excepción. Reconocer los desafíos y efectuar los ajustes correspondientes forma parte del proceso en sí.
  • ¿Quién decide y de qué manera? Esta sección presenta las decisiones que se toman durante el proceso y ofrece detalles sobre la manera en que los distintos donantes participativos asignan roles y determinan quién tiene poder y sobre qué.
  • La mecánica. Ninguna fundación es exactamente igual a otra. Analice los modelos de financiamiento participativo aquí presentados y revise las preguntas dirigidas a orientar la conversación en materia de estructuras.
  • Evaluación. La entrega participativa de donativos se basa en un proceso, es iterativa y difícil de codificar. Sin embargo, los donantes que utilizan dicho enfoque desean lograr resultados y evaluarlos. En esta sección describimos los obstáculos y perspectivas existentes.
  • Pasar del dicho al hecho: Incorporar la participación a nivel interno. Esta sección explica por qué se debe incorporar un espíritu participativo a los procesos, no solamente a las decisiones sobre entrega de financiamiento.
  • Cómo empezar​. Los donantes pueden iniciar el proceso de adopción de valores y prácticas de un enfoque participativo de asignación de donativos por medio de las distintas estrategias aquí mencionadas.
  • Apéndice y notas al final. Los recursos presentados en estas secciones refuerzan la información presentada a lo largo de toda la guía y se pueden emplear para explorar los temas con mayor profundidad.

En este documento titulado “Decidiendo juntos: Transferencia de poder y recursos mediante el proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos”, examinamos por qué y cómo implementan los donantes la asignación participativa de donativos y transfieren el poder a las comunidades que reciben el impacto de sus decisiones de financiamiento. Con ejemplos y reflexiones de un grupo diverso de donantes, exploramos los beneficios, los desafíos y los modelos del enfoque participativo de financiamiento.

El financiamiento para esta guía fue otorgado generosamente por la Fundación Ford y la Iniciativa Open Society para Europa. Twitter: #ShiftThePower.

  • ¿En qué consiste el proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos? No existe una definición formal de asignación participativa de donativos, pero sí algunos principios consensuados que distinguen dicho enfoque. La guía empieza por presentar el contexto de la práctica y por definir los valores subyacentes.
  • Elementos medulares del otorgamiento participativo de donativos. En esta sección se plantean los elementos centrales del proceso participativo de entrega de donativos y se describen el espíritu y los valores que fundamentan el enfoque.
  • Beneficios del proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos. En esta sección exploramos la lógica que lleva a los donantes a adoptar esta práctica. Para muchos de ellos, los valores y los elementos medulares forman parte de los beneficios.
  • Desafíos del proceso participativo de otorgamiento de donativos. Todo enfoque filantrópico plantea retos y el proceso participativo de financiamiento no es la excepción. Reconocer los desafíos y efectuar los ajustes correspondientes forma parte del proceso en sí.
  • ¿Quién decide y de qué manera? Esta sección presenta las decisiones que se toman durante el proceso y ofrece detalles sobre la manera en que los distintos donantes participativos asignan roles y determinan quién tiene poder y sobre qué.
  • La mecánica. Ninguna fundación es exactamente igual a otra. Analice los modelos de financiamiento participativo aquí presentados y revise las preguntas dirigidas a orientar la conversación en materia de estructuras.
  • Evaluación. La entrega participativa de donativos se basa en un proceso, es iterativa y difícil de codificar. Sin embargo, los donantes que utilizan dicho enfoque desean lograr resultados y evaluarlos. En esta sección describimos los obstáculos y perspectivas existentes.
  • Pasar del dicho al hecho: Incorporar la participación a nivel interno. Esta sección explica por qué se debe incorporar un espíritu participativo a los procesos, no solamente a las decisiones sobre entrega de financiamiento.
  • Cómo empezar​. Los donantes pueden iniciar el proceso de adopción de valores y prácticas de un enfoque participativo de asignación de donativos por medio de las distintas estrategias aquí mencionadas.
  • Apéndice y notas al final. Los recursos presentados en estas secciones refuerzan la información presentada a lo largo de toda la guía y se pueden emplear para explorar los temas con mayor profundidad.
 

Open for Good Knowledge Sharing to Strengthen Grantmaking

Knowledge has the power to spark change, but only if it is shared. In Open for Good: Knowledge Sharing to Strengthen Grantmaking, grantmakers make a strong case for foundations to openly share knowledge as an integral and strategic aspect of philanthropy. Learn from their firsthand experience how to grow organizational capacity and culture for knowledge sharing, address common concerns, and use knowledge exchange to advance your mission and impact.

Funding for this guide was generously provided by the Fund for Shared Insight, and is connected to Foundation Center’s #OpenForGood campaign.

What's in the guide?

  • Why focus on knowledge? Foundations gather and generate valuable knowledge that holds untapped potential to advance their missions.

  • What kind of knowledge sharer are you? A self-assessment designed to determine your organization’s culture and capacity for sharing knowledge and how the results point to next steps.

  • Why share knowledge? (Hint: It’s good for you) Foundations not only reap a variety of benefits from sharing knowledge, they have a responsibility to do so.

  • Five common concerns and how to move past them. How to overcome barriers to sharing knowledge by using foundation-tested solutions.

  • Putting it all together: the mechanics of knowledge sharing. The essential components of developing and transferring knowledge, whether a foundation seeks a simple practice or deeper engagement.

  • How to share knowledge more successfully. Actionable ideas to grow and strengthen a knowledge practice.

  • The long view: Creating a culture of learning through knowledge exchange. How to weave knowledge exchange into a foundation’s internal fabric as a sustainable way to emphasize the importance of learning.

  • Looking ahead: Knowledge sharing as a norm. The inevitability of knowledge sharing in the future.

     

About the author(s)

Co-founder,
Engage R+D

Director of Candid Learning
Candid

Director of Stakeholder Engagement
Candid

About the author(s)

Co-founder,
Engage R+D

Director of Candid Learning
Candid

Director of Stakeholder Engagement
Candid

Knowledge has the power to spark change, but only if it is shared. In Open for Good: Knowledge Sharing to Strengthen Grantmaking, grantmakers make a strong case for foundations to openly share knowledge as an integral and strategic aspect of philanthropy. Learn from their firsthand experience how to grow organizational capacity and culture for knowledge sharing, address common concerns, and use knowledge exchange to advance your mission and impact.

Funding for this guide was generously provided by the Fund for Shared Insight, and is connected to Foundation Center’s #OpenForGood campaign.

What's in the guide?

  • Why focus on knowledge? Foundations gather and generate valuable knowledge that holds untapped potential to advance their missions.

  • What kind of knowledge sharer are you? A self-assessment designed to determine your organization’s culture and capacity for sharing knowledge and how the results point to next steps.

  • Why share knowledge? (Hint: It’s good for you) Foundations not only reap a variety of benefits from sharing knowledge, they have a responsibility to do so.

  • Five common concerns and how to move past them. How to overcome barriers to sharing knowledge by using foundation-tested solutions.

  • Putting it all together: the mechanics of knowledge sharing. The essential components of developing and transferring knowledge, whether a foundation seeks a simple practice or deeper engagement.

  • How to share knowledge more successfully. Actionable ideas to grow and strengthen a knowledge practice.

  • The long view: Creating a culture of learning through knowledge exchange. How to weave knowledge exchange into a foundation’s internal fabric as a sustainable way to emphasize the importance of learning.

  • Looking ahead: Knowledge sharing as a norm. The inevitability of knowledge sharing in the future.

     

 

About the author(s)

Co-founder,
Engage R+D

Director of Candid Learning
Candid

Director of Stakeholder Engagement
Candid

Como a Filantropia Comunitária Transfere o Poder: O que os doadores podem fazer para tornar isso realidade

Enquanto dizeres como “pensar globalmente e agir localmente” são ouvidos por aí há décadas, ainda não estão na prática de muitos dos processos de tomada de decisão sobre investimentos filantrópicos e da cooperação internacional. Mesmo os doadores que se preocupam de verdade com a promoção da liderança e de iniciativas locais têm dificuldade em abrir mão do poder. Este artigo pretende abordar essa dificuldade, oferecendo exemplos reais de como isso pode ser feito. Esse esforço foi feito por solicitação da Global Alliance for Community Philanthropy (GACP) e do Global Fund for Community Foundations (GFCF).

Siga GACP no Twitter #ShiftThePower.

Índice

  • Filantropia comunitária: contexto para o compartilhamento e a transferência do poder
  • Filantropia comunitária como conceito: antecedentes e definições
  • Algumas dicas gerais para doadores
  • Usando doações para ampliar a filantropia comunitária e transferir o poder
  • Alinhando valores e práticas da filantropia comunitária em sua instituição doadora
  • Construindo o campo da filantropia comunitária
  • Conclusão

About the author(s)

Executive Director
Global Fund for Community Foundations

Principal
Anna Pond Consulting

While slogans like “think globally, act locally” have been around for decades, so much decision making about philanthropy and development aid still happens by stakeholders outside of affected communities. This GrantCraft Leadership Series paper by Jenny Hodgson and Anna Pond focuses on how funders around the globe are challenging this norm by sharing and shifting power into the hands of local leadership. It explores examples, advice, and the driving questions for donors interested in producing people-owned changes, without losing sight of their institutional interests.

Tweet about this paper using #ShiftThePower.

Índice

  • Filantropia comunitária: contexto para o compartilhamento e a transferência do poder
  • Filantropia comunitária como conceito: antecedentes e definições
  • Algumas dicas gerais para doadores
  • Usando doações para ampliar a filantropia comunitária e transferir o poder
  • Alinhando valores e práticas da filantropia comunitária em sua instituição doadora
  • Construindo o campo da filantropia comunitária
  • Conclusão
 

About the author(s)

Executive Director
Global Fund for Community Foundations

Principal
Anna Pond Consulting

Cómo Transfiere el Poder la Filantropía Comunitaria Qué pueden hacer las instituciones donantes para ayudar a que suceda el cambio

While slogans like “think globally, act locally” have been around for decades, so much decision making about philanthropy and development aid still happens by stakeholders outside of affected communities. This GrantCraft Leadership Series paper by Jenny Hodgson and Anna Pond focuses on how funders around the globe are challenging this norm by sharing and shifting power into the hands of local leadership. It explores examples, advice, and the driving questions for donors interested in producing people-owned changes, without losing sight of their institutional interests.

Tweet about this paper using #ShiftThePower.

¿Qué hay en el artículo?

  • Filantropía comunitaria: Contexto para la compartición y el cambio de poder
  • La filantropía comunitaria como concepto: Antecedentes y definiciones
  • Algunas sugerencias generales para los donantes
  • Uso de donaciones para promover el crecimiento de la filantropía comunitaria y el cambio de poder
  • Alinear los valores y la práctica de la filantropía comunitaria dentro de su institución de financiamiento
  • Desarrollo del campo de la filantropía comunitaria

About the author(s)

Executive Director
Global Fund for Community Foundations

Principal
Anna Pond Consulting

While slogans like “think globally, act locally” have been around for decades, so much decision making about philanthropy and development aid still happens by stakeholders outside of affected communities. This GrantCraft Leadership Series paper by Jenny Hodgson and Anna Pond focuses on how funders around the globe are challenging this norm by sharing and shifting power into the hands of local leadership. It explores examples, advice, and the driving questions for donors interested in producing people-owned changes, without losing sight of their institutional interests.

Tweet about this paper using #ShiftThePower.

¿Qué hay en el artículo?

  • Filantropía comunitaria: Contexto para la compartición y el cambio de poder
  • La filantropía comunitaria como concepto: Antecedentes y definiciones
  • Algunas sugerencias generales para los donantes
  • Uso de donaciones para promover el crecimiento de la filantropía comunitaria y el cambio de poder
  • Alinear los valores y la práctica de la filantropía comunitaria dentro de su institución de financiamiento
  • Desarrollo del campo de la filantropía comunitaria
 

About the author(s)

Executive Director
Global Fund for Community Foundations

Principal
Anna Pond Consulting

How Community Philanthropy Shifts Power What Donors Can Do to Help Make That Happen

While slogans like “think globally, act locally” have been around for decades, so much decision making about philanthropy and development aid still happens by stakeholders outside of affected communities. This GrantCraft Leadership Series paper by Jenny Hodgson and Anna Pond focuses on how funders around the globe are challenging this norm by sharing and shifting power into the hands of local leadership. It explores examples, advice, and the driving questions for donors interested in producing people-owned changes, without losing sight of their institutional interests.

Tweet about this paper using #ShiftThePower.

What's in the paper?

  • Context for Sharing & Shifting Power.  Against a backdrop of urgent global challenges—climate change, inequality, and migration—what is a donor to do? How can locally-driven development foster communities that are diverse, inclusive, and vibrant?

  • Community Philanthropy as a Concept: Background and Definitions. In this section, explore the basics behind “community philanthropy” and questions like, who is the “donor” in community philanthropy? And who is the “community”?

  • General Pointers for Donors. While approaches to community philanthropy may vary, this section includes some tips to help funders move in the right direction and set priorities.

  • Using Grants to Grow Community Philanthropy and Shift Power. This section isn’t going to talk about standardizing or developing shared grantmaking systems. Instead, this section considers the larger objectives or purposes—beyond the wire transfer itself—that surround a grant.

  • Aligning Community Philanthropy Values and Practice Inside Your Funding Institution. This section offers ideas on how to hold up a mirror and examine existing practices and relationships, and determine how to build an internal community philanthropy ethos.

  • Building the Community Philanthropy Field. Explore strategies for bringing a community philanthropy approach into broader philanthropic practice, and why this matters.

  • Conclusion. Learn how new kinds of internal checks and balances emerge when local people get involved, and how small actions can lead to big impact!

 

Response blogs:

About the author(s)

Executive Director
Global Fund for Community Foundations

Principal
Anna Pond Consulting

While slogans like “think globally, act locally” have been around for decades, so much decision making about philanthropy and development aid still happens by stakeholders outside of affected communities. This GrantCraft Leadership Series paper by Jenny Hodgson and Anna Pond focuses on how funders around the globe are challenging this norm by sharing and shifting power into the hands of local leadership. It explores examples, advice, and the driving questions for donors interested in producing people-owned changes, without losing sight of their institutional interests.

Tweet about this paper using #ShiftThePower.

What's in the paper?

  • Context for Sharing & Shifting Power.  Against a backdrop of urgent global challenges—climate change, inequality, and migration—what is a donor to do? How can locally-driven development foster communities that are diverse, inclusive, and vibrant?

  • Community Philanthropy as a Concept: Background and Definitions. In this section, explore the basics behind “community philanthropy” and questions like, who is the “donor” in community philanthropy? And who is the “community”?

  • General Pointers for Donors. While approaches to community philanthropy may vary, this section includes some tips to help funders move in the right direction and set priorities.

  • Using Grants to Grow Community Philanthropy and Shift Power. This section isn’t going to talk about standardizing or developing shared grantmaking systems. Instead, this section considers the larger objectives or purposes—beyond the wire transfer itself—that surround a grant.

  • Aligning Community Philanthropy Values and Practice Inside Your Funding Institution. This section offers ideas on how to hold up a mirror and examine existing practices and relationships, and determine how to build an internal community philanthropy ethos.

  • Building the Community Philanthropy Field. Explore strategies for bringing a community philanthropy approach into broader philanthropic practice, and why this matters.

  • Conclusion. Learn how new kinds of internal checks and balances emerge when local people get involved, and how small actions can lead to big impact!

 

Response blogs:

 

About the author(s)

Executive Director
Global Fund for Community Foundations

Principal
Anna Pond Consulting

From Words to Action A Practical Philanthropic Guide to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

As communities worldwide are becoming more diverse, they are increasingly tackling the realities of systemic inequity. Philanthropy too must acknowledge its place in the context of transformative demographic changes. Addressing diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) has been an ongoing challenge within philanthropy, and while there has been progress, it requires continual work. This GrantCraft leadership series paper by Barbara Chow dives into those challenges and opportunities to explore how DEI can become more integrated into grantmaking practices and broader foundation ethos.

Tweet about this paper using #DEI.

What's in the paper?

  • Why this Matters & Defining DEI. It is no secret that rapid demographic transformations are reshaping our society, our politics, and our culture —so where does philanthropy come into the picture? And diversity, equity, and inclusion are more than just buzzwords, so what do they really mean?
  • Where to Begin. While there is no single path to this work, nearly all those experienced with this topic suggest that there is a strong relationship between the internal work that foundations must embark on and their external grantmaking practices.
  • Bringing in Grantees. Whether it's existing grantees or new grantees, advancing DEI is likely to require opening doors to new strategies, conversations, and faces.
  • Measuring Progress. These are complex concepts to measure, so what must a foundation do to make sure it's achieving its mission? Explore how to gather demographic data and common questions asked.
  • Conclusion & Discussion Questions. Finally, we make the case for examining foundations with a DEI framework and offer discussion questions to help you begin to put these ideas into practice.

About the author(s)

Education Program Director,
Heising-Simons Foundation

As communities worldwide are becoming more diverse, they are increasingly tackling the realities of systemic inequity. Philanthropy too must acknowledge its place in the context of transformative demographic changes. Addressing diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) has been an ongoing challenge within philanthropy, and while there has been progress, it requires continual work. This GrantCraft leadership series paper by Barbara Chow dives into those challenges and opportunities to explore how DEI can become more integrated into grantmaking practices and broader foundation ethos.

Tweet about this paper using #DEI.

What's in the paper?

  • Why this Matters & Defining DEI. It is no secret that rapid demographic transformations are reshaping our society, our politics, and our culture —so where does philanthropy come into the picture? And diversity, equity, and inclusion are more than just buzzwords, so what do they really mean?
  • Where to Begin. While there is no single path to this work, nearly all those experienced with this topic suggest that there is a strong relationship between the internal work that foundations must embark on and their external grantmaking practices.
  • Bringing in Grantees. Whether it's existing grantees or new grantees, advancing DEI is likely to require opening doors to new strategies, conversations, and faces.
  • Measuring Progress. These are complex concepts to measure, so what must a foundation do to make sure it's achieving its mission? Explore how to gather demographic data and common questions asked.
  • Conclusion & Discussion Questions. Finally, we make the case for examining foundations with a DEI framework and offer discussion questions to help you begin to put these ideas into practice.
 

About the author(s)

Education Program Director,
Heising-Simons Foundation

Frameworks for Private Foundations A New Model for Impact

Philanthropy is evolving more quickly than ever with new societal challenges, new players, and new strategies. Funders are seeking to increase their effectiveness, and want clear, practical guidance for getting there. This GrantCraft leadership series paper produced in partnership with Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors (RPA), explores the core frameworks that shape private foundations, and offers a roadmap for funders interested in reflecting on these frameworks to better align purpose, public benefit, and action.

Tweet about this paper using #TheoryofFdn.

What's in the paper?

  • Introduction to the Theory of the Foundation Framework. A simple overview of the Theory of the Foundation, some of its benefits, and a roadmap for funders interested in exploring their own foundations’ frameworks.
  • Charter. What is a foundation’s form of governance, how will it make decisions—and why? In this chapter, we discuss a foundation’s charter, which describes the foundation’s scope, form of governance, and decision-making protocol at the highest level, based on written and unwritten rules.
  • Social Compact. To whom is a foundation accountable, and how is it making a difference with the special status it has been given? In this chapter we illuminate a foundation’s social compact, which is an agreement, either implicit or explicit, with society and key stakeholders.
  • Operating Capabilities. What must a foundation not just do or obtain but excel at, in order to achieve its mission? In this chapter, we explore a foundation’s operating capabilities, which are the dominant approaches that guide how the foundation carries out its work and the core competencies, resources, skills, and processes that it cultivates in order to achieve results.
  • Takeaways for Funders. In this final section, we make the case for examining foundation frameworks and offer useful tools to help you begin to put these ideas into practice today.
  • Philanthropy Canvas Worksheet. Use this worksheet at the program or foundation-wide level, or both—to help you map current operating models or develop new ones.

About the author(s)

President & CEO
Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors (RPA)

Independent Consultant

W.K. Kellogg Community Philanthropy Chair
Johnson Center for Philanthropy

Philanthropy is evolving more quickly than ever with new societal challenges, new players, and new strategies. Funders are seeking to increase their effectiveness, and want clear, practical guidance for getting there. This GrantCraft leadership series paper produced in partnership with Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors (RPA), explores the core frameworks that shape private foundations, and offers a roadmap for funders interested in reflecting on these frameworks to better align purpose, public benefit, and action.

Tweet about this paper using #TheoryofFdn.

What's in the paper?

  • Introduction to the Theory of the Foundation Framework. A simple overview of the Theory of the Foundation, some of its benefits, and a roadmap for funders interested in exploring their own foundations’ frameworks.
  • Charter. What is a foundation’s form of governance, how will it make decisions—and why? In this chapter, we discuss a foundation’s charter, which describes the foundation’s scope, form of governance, and decision-making protocol at the highest level, based on written and unwritten rules.
  • Social Compact. To whom is a foundation accountable, and how is it making a difference with the special status it has been given? In this chapter we illuminate a foundation’s social compact, which is an agreement, either implicit or explicit, with society and key stakeholders.
  • Operating Capabilities. What must a foundation not just do or obtain but excel at, in order to achieve its mission? In this chapter, we explore a foundation’s operating capabilities, which are the dominant approaches that guide how the foundation carries out its work and the core competencies, resources, skills, and processes that it cultivates in order to achieve results.
  • Takeaways for Funders. In this final section, we make the case for examining foundation frameworks and offer useful tools to help you begin to put these ideas into practice today.
  • Philanthropy Canvas Worksheet. Use this worksheet at the program or foundation-wide level, or both—to help you map current operating models or develop new ones.
 

About the author(s)

President & CEO
Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors (RPA)

Independent Consultant

W.K. Kellogg Community Philanthropy Chair
Johnson Center for Philanthropy